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MakatiMed partners with top US hospital to advance cancer care

MakatiMed partners with top US hospital to advance cancer care

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  • Makati Medical Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary this year
  • MakatiMed has partnered with UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center (UCDCCC) in a bid to boost cancer care in the Philippines
  • UCDCCC, which was designated as a comprehensive cancer center by the US National Cancer Institute, offers the most advanced methods for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancers and blood disorders

As Makati Medical Center celebrates its 50th Anniversary this year, the premiere hospital continues to drive advancement in medical care in the country by forging a partnership with one of the leading cancer centers in the United States.

MakatiMed has partnered with UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center (UCDCCC) in a bid to boost cancer care in the Philippines. The agreement with the University of California, Davis-affiliated medical center includes the development of an international Cancer Care Network, a cancer registry in MakatiMed, training programs for cancer care, a second opinion program, and on-site clinical rotation from various subspecialties in oncology.

Inpatient and outpatient procedures will be evaluated to enhance clinical workflows. The two hospitals will also share telemedicine programs and potentially collaborate in clinical trials, research studies, seminars, and multi-disciplinary teleconferences.

UCDCCC, which was designated as a comprehensive cancer center by the US National Cancer Institute, offers the most advanced methods for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancers and blood disorders.

“We want to introduce a collaborative approach in cancer care to offer the ideal treatments to our patients,” says Maria Corazon C. Consunji, MD, MakatiMed President and CEO. “This partnership will help MakatiMed achieve the best patient outcomes by embracing the advancements in oncology.”

Dr. Consunji inked the contract with Primo N. Lara, Jr., MD, UCDCCC Director. Also present in the contract signing were UCDCCC’s Gina Dayton, Chief Administrative Officer and Associate Director for Administration, and Kristin Jones, Director for Oncology Services.

For more information, please contact MakatiMed On-Call at +632.8888 999, email [email protected], or visit www.makatimed.net.ph.

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Proud Pinoy! 35 Hollywood artists with Filipino blood

Proud Pinoy! 35 Hollywood artists with Filipino blood

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  • 35 Filipinos that made it big on Hollywood
  • Artists that represent the Filipino Pride in international projects and the western industry

We all know that there’s a lot of Hollywood artists that have more than a bit of Filipino blood in them.

Here are 35 Filipinos that are currently marking their own spot at the center of the west’s entertainment industry:

Hailee Steinfield

This singer-actress’ great-grandfather is actually Boholano.

Vanessa Hudgens

Vanessa Hudgens’ mother is Filipina.

Cassie

This Step Up 2 star’s father is Filipino.

Anna Maria Perez de Tagle

Anna Maria’s parents are both Filipino.

Nicole Scherzinger

This singer’s father is Filipino.

Shay Mitchell

Actress Shay Mitchell’s mom is from Pampanga

Nicole Gale Anderson

Nicole’s mom was born in the Philippines.

Jessica Sanchez

This American Idol Season 11 runner-up’s mother is from Samal, Bataan.

Jasmine Villegas

Villegas is of Filipino, German, and Irish descent.

Sacheen Padilla

Sacheen Padilla was actually born in the Philippines.

Lalaine Vergara-Paras

Her parents are from Batangas and Pampanga

Shannyn Sossamon

Her maternal grandmother is of Hawaiian and Filipino descent.

Cheryl Burke

This Dancing with the Starts icon a mix of Filipino, Irish, and Russian blood.

Sharon Leal

Sharon’s mother is Filipino

Liza Lapira

She is of Filipino, Chinese, and of Spanish ancestry.

Vanessa Lachey

Vanessa’s mom is Filipina.

Rachel Grant

She was born in Parañaque with her Filipina mom.

Tamlyn Tomita

This Teen Wolf star’s mom has Filipino blood.

Tia Carrere

Tia is of s of Filipino, Chinese, and Spanish ancestry.

Darren Criss

This Glee star and singer is a proud Cebuano.

Steven McQueen

He is the grandson of actor Steve McQueen and actress Neile Adams, a Filipina.

Bruno Mars

This world-renowned singer is a Proud Filipino. In fact, he is a nephew of Filipino actress Ruffa Gutierrez as his grandfather is the cousin of Ruffa’s dad, Eddie Gutierrez.

Apl.De.Ap

Apl.De.Ap was born and raised in Pampanga.

Michael Copon

His father is from Cavite.

Enrique Iglesias

This famous singer’s mother is Kapampangan socialite Isabel Preysler.

Reggie Lee

This TV actor was born in Quezon City.

Billy Dec

This Emmy awardee is actually Filipino-American!

Dante Basco

This actor and voice actor has a Filipino-American blood.

Paolo Montalban

Paolo Montalban was born and raised in Manila.

Dave Bautista, Jr.

Know for his screen name ‘Batista’, this wrestling star turned actor is half-Filipino.

Jason Rogel

Jason Rogel is full Filipino.

Vincent Rodriguez III

This Crazy Ex-Girlfriend actor is Filipino-American.

Rob Schneider

This famous comedian is a proud Filipino.

Lou Diamond Phillips

His mom, Lucita Umayam Araña, was born in Candelaria, Zambales.

Jasmine Trias

American Idol Season 3 third runner-up, Jasmine Trias’ parents were from Cavite.

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Cyberattacks To Cost PH Billions, says Microsoft Asia-Pac Cybersecurity Study

Cyberattacks To Cost PH Billions, says Microsoft Asia-Pac Cybersecurity Study

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  • A large-sized organization in the Philippines can possibly incur an economic loss of US$7.5 million, more than 200 times the average economic loss for a mid-sized organization
  • Cybersecurity attacks have led to job losses in seven in ten (72%) organizations over the last year
  • Cybersecurity concerns delay Digital Transformation plans
  • Organizations are increasingly leveraging Artificial Intelligence to enhance their cybersecurity strategy

The digital age has indeed come, with the internet maneuvering institutions and businesses. The cyber world provides comfort to customers and business people alike, offering faster and digitized transactions. Nonetheless, despite the ease in these transactions, the world of online business has also been an easy target for security risks, a magnet of various cyber attacks.

Security experts discuss the economic impact of cybersecurity in the PH during Microsoft’s study launch. From L-R: Hans Bayaborda, Managing Director, Microsoft Philippines; Mary Jo Schrade, Assistant General Counsel, Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, Microsoft Asia; Angel “Lito” S. Averia, Jr., President, Philippine Computer Emergency Response Team; Atty. Raul Cortez, Corporate, External, and Legal Affairs Lead, Microsoft Philippines.

Indeed, cyber attacks are very common these days, whether in personal or organizational sites. IT geniuses can easily orchestrate a mass hysteria through a single, successful attack online, creating a breach in the businesses’ data system and spilling confidential information that may damage and cause a financial burden to businesses.

That is why the question always remains: How safe is doing your business transactions online? In a country like the Philippines, where simple internet lags can’t be dealt with, what other harms in the cyber world await us?

Billions gone with the wind

What awaits the Philippines is a potential economic loss due to cyber attacks that can hit a staggering US$3.5 billion. This is according to a study of Frost & Sullivan commissioned by Microsoft, titled “Understanding the Cybersecurity Threat Landscape in Asia Pacific: Securing the Modern Enterprise in a Digital World.”

Aiming to provide business and IT decision makers with insights on the economic cost of cybersecurity breaches and identify as well the gaps in organizations’ cybersecurity strategies, the study involved a survey of 1,300 business and IT decision makers ranging from mid-sized organizations (with 250 to 499 employees) to large-sized organizations (with more than 500 employees).

According to the study, more than half of the organizations surveyed in the Philippines have either experienced a cybersecurity incident (18%) or are not sure if they had one as they have not performed proper investigation or data breach assessment (34%).

A Closer Look: How serious Cybersecurity is

Several economic impacts are linked to cyber attacks. It is revealed in the study that a large-sized organization in the Philippines can possibly have an economic loss of US$7.5 million. Meanwhile, mid-sized organizations can possibly lose US$35,000. Apart from these significant costs, these attacks have resulted in job losses in 72% of the organizations that have experienced a cyber incident over the last 12 months.

Frost & Sullivan has created a model based on macroeconomic data and insights shared by the survey respondents. According to the model they used, there are three kinds of losses which could be obtained due to a cybersecurity attack: (1) Direct; (2) Indirect: and (3) Induced.

Direct losses are financial losses linked to a cybersecurity incident, including loss of productivity, fines, remediation cost and others. In easier words, direct losses are the physical or tangible losses after an attack. Indirect losses, on the other hand, are the opportunity costs to the organization, like customer churn due to reputation loss. Finally, Induced losses are the impacts of cyber breach on the wider ecosystem and economy, such as the decrease in consumer and enterprise spending.

Vice President and Asia Pacific Head of Enterprise for Frost & Sullivan, Edison Yu, said that although Direct losses are most noticeable, they are but just the “tip of the iceberg.” He said that many losses are hidden. However, still, these attacks can often be underestimated.

Cybersecurity Threats: The Whats and Whys

The study found that data exfiltration and data corruption are the biggest concerns in organizations in the Philippines. But why do these things happen so often in the first place? Listed below are some of the key gaps in the cybersecurity approach of participating organizations’ to protect their digital domain:

  • Security is not a priority

According to the study, only 44% of organizations consider cybersecurity before the start of a digital transformation project. Majority of respondents (56%) either think about cybersecurity only after they start the project or do not consider it at all.

  • Complex online environment

Too many cybersecurity solutions do not change anything; the survey revealed that 17% of respondents with more than 50 cybersecurity solutions could recover from cyber attacks within an hour. In contrast, more than twice as many respondents (38%) with less than 10 cybersecurity solutions responded that they can recover from cyber attacks within an hour as well. Who knows, maybe these cybersecurity solutions can cause the breach itself.

  • Lacking cybersecurity strategy

While more and more organizations are considering digital transformation to gain competitive advantage, the study has shown that 46% of respondents see cybersecurity strategy only as a means to safeguard the organization against cyber attacks rather than a strategic business enabler. A mere 25% of organizations see cybersecurity strategy as a digital transformation enabler.

Hans Bayaborda, Managing Director of Microsoft Philippines, said that Microsoft is empowering businesses in the Philippines to take advantage of digital transformation by enabling these businesses to embrace the technology that’s available to them, through its secure platform of products and services, combined with unique intelligence and broad industry partnerships.

Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Cybersecurity Defense

The use of AI has been very popular in many technological devices these days. Of course, it is now also being introduced in cybersecurity defense. AI can detect and act on threats easily, making it a potent opponent against cyber attacks. The study reveals that 79% of organizations in the Philippines have either adopted or are looking to adopt an AI approach to boost their cybersecurity.

This is primarily rooted in the fact that an AI-driven cybersecurity architecture will be more intelligent and be equipped with predictive abilities to allow organizations to fix or strengthen their security posture even before problems emerge. It will also grant companies with the capabilities to accomplish tasks, such as identifying cyber attacks, removal of persistent threats and fixing bugs, faster than any human could.

Tips on how to secure your business

According to the study, for a cybersecurity practice to be successful, organizations need to focus on their People, Process and Technology – and how each of these elements contributes to the overall security posture of the organization. Listed below are five best practices that businesses or organizations can consider in improving their defense against cybersecurity attacks:

  • Position cybersecurity as a digital transformation enabler

Disconnect between cybersecurity practices and digital transformation effort creates a lot of frustration for the employees. Cybersecurity is a requirement for digital transformation to guide and keep the company safe through its journey. Conversely, digital transformation presents an opportunity for cybersecurity practices to abandon aging practices to embrace new methods of addressing today’s risks;

  • Continue to invest in strengthening your security fundamentals

Over 90% of cyber incidents can be averted by maintaining the most basic best practices.  Maintaining strong passwords, conditional use of multi-factor authentication against suspicious authentications, keeping device operating systems, software and anti-malware protection up-to-date and genuine can rapidly raise the bar against cyber attacks. This should include not just tool-sets but also training and policies to support a stronger fundamental;

  • Maximize skills and tools by leveraging integrated best-of-suite tools

The best tools are useless in the hands of the amateur. Reduce the number of tools and the complexity of your security operations to allow your operators to hone their proficiency with the available tools. Prioritizing best-of-suite tools is a great way to maximize your risk coverage without the risk of introducing too many tools and complexity to the environment. This is especially true if tools within the suite are well-integrated to take advantage of their counterparts;

  • Assessment, review and continuous compliance

The organization should be in a continuous state of compliance. Assessments and reviews should be conducted regularly to test for potential gaps that may occur as the organization is rapidly transforming and address these gaps. The board should keep tab on not just compliance to industry regulations but also how the organization is progressing against security best practices; and

  • Leverage AI and automation to increase capabilities and capacity

With security capabilities in short supply, organizations need to look to automation and AI to improve the capabilities and capacity of their security operations. Current advancements in AI has shown a lot of promise, not just in raising detections that would otherwise be missed but also in reasoning over how the various data signals should be interpreted with recommended actions. Such systems have seen great success in cloud implementations where huge volumes of data can be processed rapidly. Ultimately, leveraging automation and AI can free up cybersecurity talents to focus on higher-level activities.

***

Technology has enabled us to create an easier, more advanced working condition. However, cybersecurity threats are inevitable. The launch of FY18 Microsoft Asia Pacific Cybersecurity Study is indeed eye-opening, as it is equally significant for an organization to have the necessary knowledge about cybersecurity, especially if it is adopting online strategies to boost popularity or to simply ease its day-to-day proceedings.

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VIRAL: Photos of devastation caused by mining draw attention of netizens

VIRAL: Photos of devastation caused by mining draw attention of netizens

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Images of the devastation of an islet in Claver, Surigao del Norte and Carrascal, Surigao del Sur have been going viral on social media. Claver is the largest municipality in Surigao del Norte. A large part of the municipal land is a mining reservation because of its large iron mineral deposits.

The Facebook Page Save Surigao has been posting images of devastation of the two municipalities. The aerial photograph of one of Claver’s islets immediately went viral as soon as it was posted last March 16, 2016. As of this writing, the photo already had over 3,000 reactions, which were mostly negative, and it has been shared over 5,000 times on Facebook.

Photo Screenshot from Facebook / Save Surigao
Photo Screenshot from Facebook / Save Surigao

The photo was captioned: “‘An islet that was once bordered with white sand is now covered with orange silt from the large scale mining sites in Claver, Surigao del Norte.” Photo courtesy of ERWIN MASCARIÑAS for MIILS ‪#‎SaveSurigao‬”

Several images were also posted on the Facebook page showing ships and trucks that collect raw mining materials and orange silt which now covered once pristine land.

An image of the ships that collect the raw materials from mining. Photo Credit: Facebook / Save Surigao
An image of the ships that collect the raw materials from mining.
Photo Credit: Facebook / Save Surigao
A truck used to collect the raw materials from mining. Photo Credit: Facebook / Save Surigao
A truck used to collect the raw materials from mining.
Photo Credit: Facebook / Save Surigao

Claver is famous for its white sand beaches. However, a large part of these white sand beaches have turned into orange due to silt resulting from the mining in the municipality.

An aerial view of Carrascal Town in Surigao del Sur, a municipality next to Claver, Surigao del Norte. Photo Credit: Save Surigao/ Erwin Mascarinas
An aerial view of Carrascal Town in Surigao del Sur, a municipality next to Claver, Surigao del Norte.
Photo Credit: Save Surigao/ Erwin Mascarinas

Carrascal, Surigao del Sur, which is situated next to Claver, is a fourth class municipality. Carrascal’s lands have also been devastated due to aggressive nickel mining. Carrascal’s incumbent Mayor is Vicente “BB” Pimentel, Jr.

Incumbent Mayor Vicente "BB" Pimentel of Carrascal, Surigao del Sur. Photo Credit: Media Access
Incumbent Mayor Vicente “BB” Pimentel of Carrascal, Surigao del Sur.
Photo Credit: Media Access

As of this writing, the incumbent governor of Surigao del Norte is Sol Matugas under the Liberal Party and the incumbent Mayor of Claver is Eddie Patan Gokiangkee.

Incumbent Governor Sol Matugas of Surigao del Norte. Photo Credit: Mindanews / Erwin Mascarinas
Incumbent Governor Sol Matugas of Surigao del Norte.
Photo Credit: Mindanews / Erwin Mascarinas
Incumbent Mayor of Claver, Surigao del Norte Eddie Patan Gokiangkee. Photo Credit: Caraga News
Incumbent Mayor of Claver, Surigao del Norte Eddie Patan Gokiangkee.
Photo Credit: Caraga News

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