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Sen. Ping Lacson slams critics and fellow lawmakers who changed their votes on Anti-Terror Bill

Ping Lacson ranted against the critics of the controversial Anti-Terrorism Bill.

  • He is one of the principal authors of the said bill.
  • The senator clarified that he made sure that the bill “adheres” to the 1987 Constitution.

One of the most talked-about issues in the Philippines right now is the swift passing of the Anti-Terrorism Bill.

As many netizens have found the bill unconstitutional, they have been continuously campaigning against its transition into law.

Senator Panfilo Lacson, one of the principal authors of the Anti-Terrorism Bill, has taken it to Twitter to call out those who are in disagreement with the bill’s purpose.

He said that the bill is supposed to protect the people from terrorists and named Abu Sayyaf and ISIS as examples.

“I made sure that it adheres to the Bill of Rights as enumerated in the 1987 Constitution,” he wrote.

He then proceeded to call out the lawmakers who changed their votes after the third and final reading of the bill and accused them of not reading the entire bill.

Among them were Albay 2nd District Rep. Joey Salceda and Bulacan 3rd District Representative Lorna Silverio, who switched from voting yes to abstaining.

Lacson then shared an infographic of the supposed impact of terrorism on the world.

In his latest tweet, he said that those who oppose the bill have “shifted their aim to target the implementation.”

Netizens then reacted to Senator Lacson’s tweets.

https://twitter.com/cczeli/status/1270688473716948992

https://twitter.com/cczeli/status/1270680288868196352


The anti-terrorism bill is now awaiting the signature of President Rodrigo Duterte unless he vetoes it. If he decides not to act on it, the bill will lapse into law after 30 days from receipt.

Written by Jacks

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