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DILG warns local officials of placing their pictures and names on relief goods as a campaigning tool

A list of the 18 million poorest families will be submitted by barangay officials that would receive financial aid and additional food packs subject to vetting and approval of the social welfare department.

On behalf of the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG), Undersecretary Jonathan Malaya told DZMM that the agency has banned local officials from placing their names and pictures on relief goods.

It was mostly the indigent families in Luzon that were recipients of these relief goods. This came after the agency was informed that barangay officers would place their names on envelopes containing cash to families that originally came from the national government as financial aid.

Malaya says that now is not the time to play politics, but to instead help the needy.

“Hindi po ito panahon ng pamumulitika, panahon po ito ng public service,”

“Naglabas na rin po si Secretary [Eduardo] Año ng kautusan sa ating mga LGU na walang epal, walang pangalan, walang picture at hayaan ang mga barangay na i-handle nang tama ang paglalabas ng ayuda,” he added.

A list of the 18 million poorest families will be submitted by barangay officials that would receive financial aid and additional food packs subject to vetting and approval of the social welfare department.

Those who are qualified include the elderly, migrant workers in distress, persons with a disability, and single parents.

The aid distribution started in 2 pilot barangays located in Tondo, Manila and in Parañaque. Other residents should wait for further announcements and prepare IDs.

The Philippines confirmed 136 deaths out of its total 3,018 cases of the respiratory disease.

Politicians who are using the pandemic as a tool to campaign for themselves is nothing new.

A few weeks ago, Quezon City Mayor Joy Belmonte was called out by netizens for doing so.

She distributed “essential health items” to indigent families but got called out for several things that the people did not like.

The #JoyParaSaBayan (which was also printed on the bags) did not sit well with netizens. The funding for the items actually comes from taxpayers.

https://twitter.com/MaamSyj/status/1239179883973971969?s=20

She was also criticized for saying she ‘decided’ to do it.

Caloocan Congressman Along Malapitan was also called out for doing the same.

Manila counselor Princess Abante and congressman Benny Abante were also caught including their names and faces on the gallons of alcohol distributed to the city’s barangay halls.

Surigao del Norte 2nd District Rep. Robert Ace Barbers filed the House Bill No. 71 or the “Anti-Epal Bill” last year to forbid and penalize government officials who place their names and faces on government projects funded by the taxpayers.

“Crediting individuals instead of the government on any public work, project, assistance or program is unethical and a manifestation of the nation’s deeply troubling political patronage.

“This system of political advertising also promotes corruption among our officials, sending a wrong sense of accomplishment among the citizens.”

Senator Bong Go recently just committed the same mistake.

Netizen Leah Navarro went on Twitter and called him out for taking advantage of the pandemic.

Go made it look like he donated 400 surgical masks. Navarro speculates that Go hoarded the masks and placed his name on the box.

An uncensored photo shows the donors of the masks.

Netizens reacted saying this is the reason people are hesitant to help.

Written by JO-EST B. TAN

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