in , ,

Raymund Marasigan slams politicians who use unauthorized pop songs as campaign jingles

  • One of the famous rock musicians took a jab on politicians using OPM songs as jingles.
  • Marasigan also pleaded to the public to NOT vote for politicians who have used unauthorized election jingle based on OPM songs.
  • Politicians should seek permission from the composer in using their songs for campaign jingles and that’s the right way of doing things.

During campaign period, politicians normally use different strategies to attract the attention of voters and one of those is modifying popular OPM songs as campaign jingles. Jingles are effective means to make a brand awareness and recall for their names during the election.

However, this practice negates the will of other musicians because these politicians mostly did not seek permission from the composers.


Tech Jungle: VIVO V17 PRO Review


Raymund Marasigan one of the famous rock musicians took a jab at politician-candidates saying “Dipa naelect nagnakaw na.”

He was referring to the use of popular songs without any permission as campaign jingles.

The former Eraserheads drummer posted on his Twitter account pleading to NOT vote for politicians who have used unauthorized OPM songs as their election campaign jingles.

“Whenever you hear an unauthorized bastardized version of a popular song as an election jingle, pls don’t vote that candidate,” Marasigan said.

A Netizen named King Audric asked Marasigan how they will know if a song was authorized by the artist.

The rocker replied to the Netizen that they can inquire with the artist and his management, or the Filipino Society of Composers, Artist and Publishers (Filcap).

Marasigan’s post caught the attention of the netizens and agrees with his allegations.

In 2016 election, FILSCAP tried to forge an agreement with the Commission on Elections.

This is to remind politicians that they should seek permission from the composer in using their songs for campaign jingles. In this manner, the candidate abides with the Republic Act 8293, or the Intellectual Property Code of the Philippines.

Written by Rhelyn Harder

An open-minded person who seeks to inspire readers through writing. She believes that having the freedom and courage to express oneself is an opportunity to influence others.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading…

0

Comments

Depression overruled Mark Joseph Ubalde’s life, a video reveals his fight with Depression