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COVID-19 vaccines do not cause a magnetic reaction

Health experts have also admitted that vaccines contain metal but dosages are too small to result in anything bizarre

The new TikTok trend suggesting that taking a COVID-19 vaccine shot causes a magnetic reaction is entirely fake.

These videos show how metal objects such as utensils and coins attach to an arm of a person who just got inoculated against the coronavirus.

Arshie Larga, a pharmacist, is surprised at how many people still believe the nonsense.

In a video, he explains why the videos could be staged. He said that vaccines might contain magnetic metals, but the amount is so little that causing a magnetic reaction is impossible.

And the probable reason why objects stick is because of the adhesive from bandaids.

The AstraZeneca and Sputnik V vaccines are the only vaccines in the Philippines that contain magnetic metals such as magnesium.


Health experts have also admitted that vaccines contain metal, but dosages are too small to be bizarre.

Written by JO-EST B. TAN

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